Happy New Year from Historic Hamilton.

For a long time I have been fascinated by Hamilton’s history, I have read numerous books about my home town and as I drive from place to place, I always look out for old buildings or land where factories, houses or farms once stood.

I have often thought  about the Hamilton Palace and its Dukes and it saddens me to think of what a credit the Palace could have been to Hamilton if it was still standing today.

Eight  years ago my mum bought me a book written by local author and Historian Wilma Bolton, it was called “Black Faces and Tackety Boots”. I always knew about the coal mines of Hamilton, however, like most people I never knew about the horrific fatality’s of men and young boys, who were working underground. I read about the hardship on families as well as the good times and community spirit that the Miners had.

After reading Wilma Bolton’s books, once again I started thinking of Hamilton’s history and its people. I wanted to do something myself but didn’t know where to start. I stumbled across a website called “The Blantyre Project” a page set up by Paul Veverka. This is also a man really passionate about his home town of Blantyre. I got speaking to Paul and over a few months he gave me some really good advice on putting together a website and the best way to start my research. I spoke with my wife Emma and discussed with her about starting my very own website about Hamilton and its people and she was and still is very supportive.

On the 19th of April 2015 I set up Historic Hamilton as a Facebook Page. I intended to write about Hamilton and pack it with facts and stories about the town. I thought that I might get a couple of hundred likes, but after  4-5 weeks, the page rocketed and I was getting between 60-150 likes per day!

Stats.
The first screen shot of Historic Hamilton showing the Stats for the page.

The page went in a totally different direction as to what I had planned out in my head, all of the group members started to send us their family photos and stories and before I knew it I was inundated with photos and requests.

As of now, when I write this, the page has  8,986 likes and when I do a story it generates between 2000 & 20,000 views. This is all down to all of you – the members of Historic Hamilton!

We have people in the group from all over the world and frequent contributors from Canada, USA, Dubai (UAE) & Australia. One thing that really makes me happy, is that the page has reunited families and old friends that lost touch many years ago. Please keep sending us your pictures and stories and they will be shared across Hamilton, the UK and the rest of the world.

One thing that I would like to see  before the end of 2015 is the page hitting 9000 likes!! All we need is 14 more people to like the page, so tell your friends and family about Historic Hamilton and ask them to stop by and give us a like.

Looking towards the future I will be planning to put Historic Hamilton on paper and write a book about Hamilton and it’s people, so you never know, you or your family might just appear in it.

I hope that Historic Hamilton continues to take you on a nostalgic journey and  bring you happiness when you stop by and visit our page.

As the end of 2015 approaches from my family to yours, we would like to wish you all a very happy, healthy & prosperous New Year.

Aw the best for 2016.

Garry, Emma,Daniel, Ryan & Caiden McCallum.

 

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THE BRANDON BREWERY

At one point in time Hamilton had it’s very own brewery! The Brandon Brewery was situated on the east side of Quarry Road, which is now called Quarry Street.

The Brewery was listed as a “Small Brewery” and the gate keeper was called William McKenzie who lived at the Gate house between 1858-1861.

BrandonBrewery.Fix.
The Brandon Brewery (Top Right) in the 1858 Map of Hamilton.

The Brewery was still here in 1913 as it appeared on the map of this year, However the next map that i looked at was an areal photo of the town taken in 1944 and it was no longer there.

Brandon Brewery.
The former site of the Brandon Brewery. 

The picture above taken from Google Street view is the former site of the Brandon Brewery. So far I have been unable to find any further information on the brewery, however this story will be archived and investigated in the future.

Brandon Brewery1
1944 Arial photo of Hamilton.

The Riot in The Ranche

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The Ranche in the 1970s

Up until the 1980’s the corner of Strathaven Road and Graham Avenue was dominated by a large red sandstone building comprising of shops, flats and on the prime corner was the site of Hamilton’s most famous public house, The Ranche. One of the features of the Ranche was the sloping floor which was caused by the collapse of the underground coal workings which honeycombed the area.

The Ranche was a favorite of the local miners and in 1926 there took place an extraordinary incident that is still spoken of today, eighty nine years later and is known as the riot in the Ranche.

The main character in the chain of events which led to the riot was a miner called Bob McTaggart, a powerfully built man with a neck and shoulders like a prize bull.

Altogether Bob, who lived in Low Waters and worked   in the former Cadzow pit was definitely no angel, he was well thought of in the ‘Cadzow Rows’  that now demolished collection of over 200 miners homes situated off Strathaven Road.

But Bob had, as all mortals have, some failings; the main one being that after a few pints he liked to fight. You could call him the local ‘Hard Man with a soft Centre’

On a Saturday night after a few pints, 5ft 9in Bob would weave his way down past Cadzow Bridge into School Street. By the time he arrived he would be stripped to the waist; then standing in the middle of the street he would bellow his war cry to the tenement windows; Come oot and fight….I’ll fight the best man….Come oot…..

The neighbours, well accustomed to this ritual viewed it as their Saturday night entertainment, but it is doubtful if there were many who took up his offer as Bob also had quite a formidable reputation as an amateur boxer.

It was this penchant for a fight that got him barred from the Ranche public house in Strathaven Road which was the local for many Cadzow Row Miners.

On the evening of Friday the 27th May 1926, the owner of the Ranche turned up at the county police headquarters with a request fort the police to be present at the pub. Through the grapevine, he had heard that Bob McTaggart intended to partake of quiet refreshments that very night,despite being barred from the pub. Returning to the Ranche in the illustrious company of the police inspector and superintendent (both of whom were dropped off a short distance from the pub) the owner entered the premises and there, standing at the bar was Bob.

At the trial, according to the evidence of the owner, he told McTaggart that he was not welcome as he had been barred. At this, Bob alleged to have shouted; “you Bastard, you have insulted me. I’ll murder you” and then made a run for him. The owner beat a hasty retreat out of the door and Bob, hot on his heels, ran strait in to the arms of the law, who just happened to be out side; captured he was returned to the pub, where he was soon on the receiving the end of police batons. At the sight of this assault on one of their own, the clientele of the establishment attempted to release Bob from police custody and thus began, the riot in the ranche.

Before it was Finnish, the gantry, along with every window, mirror and glass in the pub had been smashed and police reinforcements had to be brought in from Hamilton and Blantyre police stations.

With an estimated 100 men fighting inside the pub and a crowd of approximately  500 men outside baying for police blood, the only way to restore public order was for the police to release a much battered but still defiant Bob McTaggart. This defused the situation just enough to empty the pub and calm the crowd down, but not for very long, soon the riot was in full swing again. The police and the Ranche came under fire from a fusillade of stones, bricks and anything else the crowd could get their hands on.

The arrival of the Black Maria containing 10 police officers from Hamilton Burgh police station and more men from the county police headquarters and Blantyre police station sent the crowd scattering in every direction ; through back courts, up closes, anywhere to get them out of the clutches of the officers.

Early the following morning the arrests began, there was hardly a house on Cadzow Rows where their wasn’t a man sitting waiting for the knock on the door. Police raided numerous houses in the area. Identity parades were held and eventually 11 men were charged with mobbing and rioting.

The trial at Hamilton Sheriff lasted three days. One by one the witnesses took their stand in the witness box all anxious to give their version of the riot. The one exception was William McMorran Symington, the barman who had been working in the Ranche that night and for reasons known only to him (and possibly the Cadzow miners) he had appeared to have developed amnesia when questioned about who was there and what took place.

At first he thought there could have been about 30 men present in the bar when the owner returned from the county police headquarters, but then he changed his mind, reducing the number to 20 men. Finally, he settled on only four people being present, protesting that he couldn’t see, as he had taken cover during the riot!

The owners chauffeur however, James Robertson, (A Blantyre Man) appeared to have a photographic memory. He said that having going in to the bar, he soon left after being struck by a pint measure. Outside finding that his windscreen had been smashed, he climbed in to the vehicle hoping that he could at some point, move it out of the way. Identifying Daniel (Gowdie) Hughes one of the accused, he said that he had come running out of the pub covered in blood from a head wound and had stood cursing and swearing at the door of the Ranche. He had to convince the jury that the that this Cadzow was shouting to the crowds outside “Come on you fellows; don’t just stand there; come in and pull the whole bloody lot out. Them dirty Bastards are using their sticks wholesale” and also said that Hughes was encouraging the crowd to break down the front door which had been locked behind him.

The chauffeur also identified another of the accused, Alexander Murphy, as being the man who pulled him out of the car by the throat and informed him that if he “attempted to go for help, his car would go down the brae wanting wheels….” Robertson said that the crowd by this time was throwing a hail of stones at the building and superintendent Taylor came outside and appealed for them to stop. The reply was more stones and he saw one hit the superintendent   on the jaw.

He described how at this point Taylor drew his baton and then watched with amazement on his face that w wee man dressed in blue , marched up and down the pavement in front of him firing questions at him. (The bar room lawyer?)… The chauffeur  identified this man as Owen Martin. Another man Robert (Bobby) Mount was identified as also being in the vicinity when superintendent Taylor’s baton was pulled from his hand. (It was never recovered.) Robertson told how the officer started to chase the culprit, but he was knocked down, surrounded and then attacked by the crown, eventually being rescued by inspector Mutch who came to his aid and managed to get him back in to the Ranche.

Having done his best to jail half of the accused, James Robertson was allowed to stand down from the witness box.

Some of the defendants pleaded alibi and produced witnesses to prove it. One, James (Wee Pea) Canning in an attempt to scale down the size of the riot, put it to the Jury that the crowd outside the Ranche had not actually taken part in the riot; they were merely passing the pub on the way home from the devotions at the local Catholic Church.

At the end of the trial, 10 of the accused miners, including Bob McTaggart, received a six-month prison sentence, the other miner James McGhie got four months and the legend of the riot in the Ranche slipped into the pages of Hamilton’s History.

Several years after the riot Bob McTaggart with his wife and children emigrated to Canada where he lived intill he was in his seventies and died after losing a leg in a lift accident.

The above story has been taken with full permission from the book Black Faces & Tackety  boots written by local author Wilma Bolton. Please visit http://www.wilmabolton.com for information on where to buy her books, packed with stories from the local coal miners of Hamilton.

HORSE KILLED

HORSE KILLED

It was reported in the Daily Record on the 20th June 1914 that a horse yoked to an empty cart bolted from the loading bank of the central station yesterday morning, and ran off down Quarry Street.

Test.

Completing its mad gallop by leaping through the large plate glass window of Regent House. The horse, a five-year-old Clydesdale, valued at £80, died half an hour later from loss of blood. The damage to the window amounts to about £20.

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As most horses in those days were only classed as working animals, i wonder if the owner was more upset of the fact he had to pay for the window, or the cost of replacing the horse!

A CHRISTMAS POEM

A survey has bin done,fur the bestest” ever Xmas smiles,,
So a big well done tae Hamiltonians, ye awe won by miles,,

The survey wisnae jist fur Xmas, but awe the year round,,
Walkin’roon Hamilton,realy wis uplifting”our survey found,,

A wee woman said, it’s no jist Xmas wir always happy up here,,
Another wan piped up, that’s nothin ye should see us it New Year””

To all Hamiltonians, we wish you a Xmas full of festive fayre””
Go on visit “Historic Hamilton ” yil’ find awe the answers There””

MERRY CHRISTMAS & A HAPPY NEW YEAR.

Poem written for Historic Hamilton by Hugh Haney.

Christmas in Hamilton 1918.

CHRISTMAS IN HAMILTON 1918.
 
Taken from the Hamilton Advertiser on Saturday the 28th December 1918.
 
Wednesday was an ideal day. A mild frost gave the atmosphere an invigorating effort without being too cold. It was even more invigorating to feel that one could enter into the enjoyment of the happy season on this occasion without the burden of war lying like a pall over ones hart.
 
It was like a release from a distressful bondage, and it was observant in the faces and activities of the people. Shopping was more lively, and the shoppers were more numerous that at any Christmas since the war broke out, and quite naturally so.
 
Though the bells of peace have not yet rung out their happy pearl, their tongues have joined in a rapturous burst of song over an armistice, the accepted terms of which dramatically declare the defeat of the foe.
 
All the Christmas services in the churches last Sabbath were in thankful celebration of the birth of the prince of peace, and that beautiful attribute of the saviour before a message, the truth and the joy of which every heart could understand as never before.
 
On Christmas day special Christmas services were conducted in Auchingramont established church, Cadzow parish and St. Mary’s RC Church.
 
The day was observed as a partial holiday, public buildings were closed, and most shops businesses at the post office was heavy, particularly in the parcel departments.
 
The exchange of Christmas presents between friends at home was more evident this year than on any December during the last four years.