Thomas Hamilton & Helen Lochore.

Thomas Hamilton.

Seeing old faces from the past is really great if you find out that you are related to the people in them. This picture was taken in December 1946 and in the picture, we have Mr Thomas Hamilton & Helen Lochore who in this year were celebrating their Dimond wedding anniversary.

Thomas & Helen were born and bred in Hamilton, they were natives of the Ducal Town and they lived in the Hamilton their whole lives and between them they had 9 children, 7 of whom survived to adulthood. They had 12 grandchildren & 7 great grandchildren, so there is every chance that their descendants still live in the town today.

For their Dimond wedding anniversary in 1946 they held their party at the Liberal Club Rooms on Brandon Street where they shared their day with their friends and family.

When they married they lived at Helens house at 3 Fore Row where they spent most of their years and in 1946 they lived at 142 Almada Street and Thomas who was very well known in the town and was a ‘Kenspeckle’ figure in junior football circles. He spent all of his working life working for the Hamilton Advertiser working in the print room. When he retired early in 1929 he had given 51 year’s service to the Hamilton Advertiser.

Thomas was secretary of the Lanarkshire junior football association for 48 years and Lanarkshire junior league secretary from the beginning of the first world war until 1939.

They had two sons who lost their lives in the great war of 1914-1918.

The parents of Thomas were called James Hamilton who was a Joiner & his mother was called Margaret Polson. When Thomas married he lived at the family home which was at 5 Park Road.

 

Margaret Polson.
Margaret Polson.

 

Helen Lochore’s parents were called John Lochore who was a Handloom Weaver & Helen Millar.

Hamiltopn Wedding.

Are you a descendant of Thomas & Helen? If you are, then let us know where in the world you live now.

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Hi Folks,

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Hi Folks,

Next week we will be reposting Historic Hamilton’s most popular stories of 2017. This will give you all a chance to have another read over our fully researched publications and it will also let our new readers see what they have missed.

Do you want to know the History of a building in Hamilton? Is there a family mystery that you would like solved or are you curious about your Ancestry? Send us the details and we will look into this for you.

One more thing! Don’t forget to buy your copy of the Hamilton advertiser this week as we will have an advert in the paper, so remember and tell us what you think.

OUT WITH THE OLD AND IN THE NEW.

Hammy Ad Cake

For me, it was the end of an era for Campbell Street -when I heard that the Hamilton Advertiser were moving premises after reporting the local news from its old building for more than 150 years. The old press building was at the heart of the town and in its heyday, not only did the reporters all work from the newsroom they also printed and distributed the newspapers from here.

They finally closed its doors to the public on Wednesday the 13th of December and just before it closed, the last customer walked in – this customer was me! Me being the sentimental guy that I am, was quick to tell everybody that I was the very last customer in over 150 years publishing to use the Hamilton Advertisers services in the Campbell Street building. I love nostalgia and it got me thinking of who was the very first customer to pay for the Hamilton Advertisers services. So, a wee trip to the Hamilton Reference library will be on the cards to see if I can find out.

I have met with the staff at the Hamilton Advertiser before, including the Editor and big chief Robert Mitchel or Bob as he is better known to his staff.

Hammy Ad2
Bob’s teamwork great together and when I first met them I was a bit apprehensive walking through the doors of the old press building as I had in my head that the editor was going to be like the one in Spiderman shouting at all of his staff. But no, they are all very nice people and very approachable, and always if you have a story, then they are more that willing for you to come and have a chat with them.

So, as I had mentioned, I was the very last person to use the Hamilton Advertiser in Campbell Street, I was placing an advert in the paper for Historic Hamilton which you will all see in next weeks edition. I spoke to two lovely ladies called who were called Lorna Marshall who is the receptionist and Carole Mathers, who is the Multi-Media Sales Executive.

We ended up chatting about the History of the building and Carole had mixed emotions as she has worked at the old Campbell Street office for 30 years. We got chatting about the strange goings on and apparently, the old Campbell Street building has its very own Ghost.

Hammy Ad1

So, it was sad times for Carole too as this building has played a very big part in her life, but as they say you have to move with the times. I only hope that this Historic building does not get torn down and become another car-park, lets watch this space – pardon the pun.

The new Hamilton Advertiser premises are now located on the ground floor of the Brandon House business centre and they have an open plan office that looks out over Duke Street and the building is also right at the bus station, so bear in mind, Bob’s reporters are watching you as you walk in and out from the bus station and they will see everything that’s going on. This is also an excellent vantage point for the ‘Reader of the Week’ section, so if you’re up this way, then you may just be lucky enough to make Page 3 and get a free box of chocolates.

I paid a visit yesterday (Friday the 15th) and as usual, Bob was still in the office arranging next weeks stories, I had a wee chat with Bob and Carole and they were showing me around. I managed to get a wee bit of the Tunnocks Cake and Carole was showing me my advert for Historic Hamilton. So maybe I can also be classed as the first customer in the New building?

Hammy Ad3

Times are indeed changing as more of the younger generation are turning to news in the digital format, The Hamilton Advertiser’s Facebook page now has a massive 17,314 followers but I’m sure that most of you will agree that it’s just not the same as sitting down with a cup of tea at the table and having a read of the local news.

We still turn to the Advertiser to either do the crossword or to see what is happening in the town or to find the local guy who will give you a free quote to fix your fence. With Bob’s team working all week to get you the best stories I’m sure that the newspaper will still be here for many decades to come. So, to all the staff, good luck in your new home and we hope that you have many happy working years at the Brandon House building.

Hammy Ad4

THIS IS A PUBLIC LIBRARY.

THIS IS A PUBLIC LIBRARY.

Transcribed by Wilma Bolton from The Hamilton Advertiser.

 

Storehouse of the culture of generations

 

The university of the working man;

 

The meeting place of the authors,

 

The poets and philosophers

 

Who have shaped the destiny of civilisation through the ages

 

A stronghold of the freedom of democracy

 

Where free-men may read what free-men write,

 

The temple of all the arts

 

Where the humblest and the mightiest may enter

 

Friend, you stand on sacred ground.

     THIS IS A PUBLIC LIBRARY.

Ref. 14/11/1942. Hamilton Advertiser.

(Transcribed by Wilma Bolton)

THE HAMILTON REFERENCE LIBRARY

Library.
The Hamilton Reference Library is contained within Hamilton Town House Library, located at 102 Cadzow Street. Until 2009 this part of the library was unknown to me. I discovered this treasure trove when researching my family tree.
 
I was researching my Di & Granny’s side of the family when I was directed to the Carnegie Room upstairs. As I walked towards the big brown doors leaving the lending library, I looked through the window, went through the imposing Carnegie vestibule, and proceeded to walk up the grand staircase. It was like walking into a film set from a more elegant era.
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As you go up the first set of steps, you are greeted with a beautiful stained-glass window depicting the Hamilton Burgh crest. Arriving at the top of the building reveals the magnificent Carnegie Reading Room with vaulted ceiling and decorative plasterwork.
 
The first thing that you notice in the Reference Library, is how peaceful this upper floor is and even though it is usually busy, there is a sense of respect for other people who are studying or using computers and the quietness of the place is really relaxing.
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Hamilton Town House is jointly operated by South Lanarkshire Council and South Lanarkshire Leisure & Culture. The building contains both the town’s main public hall (formerly known as Hamilton Town Hall) and public library, as well as various Council departments including licensing, registration and community learning.
 
The building, although appearing to be one, was constructed in stages over a 21-year period. The library was opened by Andrew Carnegie in 1907, the adjacent Town House offices were opened by King George V in 1914 and finally the Town Hall completed the building in 1928.
 
In 2002, the entire building was closed for a massive refurbishment project, costing £9 million. This was required to bring the internal facilities to current building regulation standards (including modern lifts), whilst also restoring the exterior of this A-listed building. In August 2004, the new integrated Town House complex was revealed to the public, with an official opening by HRH Princess Anne in September. The library won two awards: the “Architect Meets Practicality Award” for libraries of significant architectural interest that are practical and user-friendly and the “Mary Finch Accessibility Award” for the library which most addresses access issues from physical through to cultural barriers.
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For those of you who are not aware of the Reference Library, I would like to share what you can find in there. The resources are incredible, and include the following: Local Authority / Council minutes and reports dating to the 1600s, a section of the Hamilton Estate Papers, a historic collection of over 2000 indexed photographs, a large postcard collection, historic and contemporary electoral registers, Valuation rolls, Hamilton Advertiser and other local newspapers in print bound volume and on micro-film, a collection of fiction and poetry by local authors and about Lanarkshire, a collection of historic and geographical guides relating to Lanarkshire, a large collection of historic and contemporary maps covering Lanarkshire, Census reports on micro-film, free access within the library to the family history website Ancestry.com.
 
There are 15 Internet-linked PCs available in the ActiveIT suite, in addition to free WiFi throughout the building.
 
All published material is searchable on the South Lanarkshire Libraries catalogue online at
 
In addition to the materials held, ‘Scotland’s People’ (https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/gclid=CJKTv5H64tQCFeeV7QodkfcHaA)
 
Vouchers are for sale, there are drop – in sessions for family history advice and guidance, Nostalgia Days at intervals throughout the year, and regular displays relating to the history of Hamilton and Lanarkshire.
Angela Ward..JPG
 
One important thing that I would like to mention is the staff who work at the Reference Library. They are extremely knowledgeable and helpful. One real gem is long-time library assistant Angela Ward whose knowledge of Hamilton is unrivalled. The staff handle family research requests continuously from local and international enquirers.
 
The staff at the Hamilton Reference Library really do try to accommodate everyone, but as you can imagine they are sometimes stretched, so if you are planning to visit the Reference Library for research, then please call in advance to secure a seat and avoid disappointment. The telephone number is 01698 452121.
 
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On a more personal note, the Hamilton Advertiser copies that are kept here in storage areas are the last remaining copies ever to be printed of each year and cannot be reproduced in original form. In this digital age, I would like to see the Hamilton Advertiser archived in this way, future proofing the collection for future generations. The collection of Hamilton Advertisers is so large, it would take a lot of time and money for this to happen. These records have preserved the history of Hamilton week by week since 1856. I firmly believe that they should be digitised for future generations to read. Just think that in 100 years from now, someone will be reading what we did today as history! Let’s try put a plan in action and come up with an idea to get funding to have Hamilton’s history stored and made available online.

ROUND UP IS OVER AT MEN ONLY RANCHE.

 

ROUND UP IS OVER AT MEN ONLY RANCHE.
Transcribed by Wilma Bolton.

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Hamilton’s last drinking haven for men wanting to avoid wives, girlfriends or mothers is to go.

The Ranche Bar in Strathaven Road, famed for its sloping floor and no women-in-the-bar-rule is the victim of the 20th century progress.

Those responsible for the demise of The Ranche are not women’s libbers but planners.
A lot of men will be homeless” joked one of the lunchtime drinkers at the bar this week.
According to Hamilton’s chief planning officer Crawford Russell, what will happen, though plans have still to be firmed up, is that The Ranche and adjoining shops will be demolished to make way for 40-50 council homes.

These proposals are contained in the district council’s five-year plan, a report which outlines what changes Hamilton can expect over the next few years.

Wind of the proposed demolition reached shop-keepers in Strathaven Road last week.
They rejected immediately, organising a petition which has the support from tenants living in the nearby Eddlewood Housing scheme.

Miss Gwen Richards has one of those small shops which sells everything from cigarettes to Jaffa-cakes, and she is incensed at the idea that her shop could be demolished with no replacement.
This shop was opened by my grandmother when my grandfather died, she said “it will be sadly missed.” A pile of petition forms lie on her counter next to the Jaffa-cakes, and already Miss Richards has gathered more than 100 signatures.

SIGN.
Next door there is a chip-shop which has been there as long as Miss Richards can remember. They are collecting signatures. And at the bookies, two doors up, punters are putting their names to the petition after filling in their betting-slips. The Pakistani mini-store- also as a pile of petition forms for shoppers.

“A lot of people from Eddlewood shop here and there’s a lay-by outside, so we get a lot of passing trade.” Explained Miss Richards, adding “we are going to put forward our petition to the council. It’s up to the people now to sign it.”

The Ranche2.JPG

There’s no petition nestling next to the pints in The Ranche.
Last year, in an interview with the Advertiser the manager of The Ranche, Mr Alex Allison,, said the publican would rather see the bar closed than admit ladies. Ref Hamilton Advertiser. 30/4/1982. Page 1

Sir Rodger Moor Reads the Hamilton Advertiser. 1977

Sir Rodger Moor1

It’s 1977 and the late Sir Rodger Moore is taking a well-deserved break from filming The Spy who loved me. What else is there to do but catch up on all the latest gossip that’s been happening in Hamilton.

I would like to think that Sir Rodger Moore was a weekly reader of The Hamilton Advertiser, however, it would more likely have been one of the workers on the set that lived in or around Hamilton who bought the Advertiser.

Great picture none the less and a big thank you to Paul Veverka for sending this picture to Historic Hamilton.