THIS IS A PUBLIC LIBRARY.

THIS IS A PUBLIC LIBRARY.

Transcribed by Wilma Bolton from The Hamilton Advertiser.

 

Storehouse of the culture of generations

 

The university of the working man;

 

The meeting place of the authors,

 

The poets and philosophers

 

Who have shaped the destiny of civilisation through the ages

 

A stronghold of the freedom of democracy

 

Where free-men may read what free-men write,

 

The temple of all the arts

 

Where the humblest and the mightiest may enter

 

Friend, you stand on sacred ground.

     THIS IS A PUBLIC LIBRARY.

Ref. 14/11/1942. Hamilton Advertiser.

(Transcribed by Wilma Bolton)

Advertisements

THE HAMILTON REFERENCE LIBRARY

Library.
The Hamilton Reference Library is contained within Hamilton Town House Library, located at 102 Cadzow Street. Until 2009 this part of the library was unknown to me. I discovered this treasure trove when researching my family tree.
 
I was researching my Di & Granny’s side of the family when I was directed to the Carnegie Room upstairs. As I walked towards the big brown doors leaving the lending library, I looked through the window, went through the imposing Carnegie vestibule, and proceeded to walk up the grand staircase. It was like walking into a film set from a more elegant era.
Stain Glass window with Burgh Crest..JPG
 
As you go up the first set of steps, you are greeted with a beautiful stained-glass window depicting the Hamilton Burgh crest. Arriving at the top of the building reveals the magnificent Carnegie Reading Room with vaulted ceiling and decorative plasterwork.
 
The first thing that you notice in the Reference Library, is how peaceful this upper floor is and even though it is usually busy, there is a sense of respect for other people who are studying or using computers and the quietness of the place is really relaxing.
Wilma Bolton's Display Cabinet..JPG
 
Hamilton Town House is jointly operated by South Lanarkshire Council and South Lanarkshire Leisure & Culture. The building contains both the town’s main public hall (formerly known as Hamilton Town Hall) and public library, as well as various Council departments including licensing, registration and community learning.
 
The building, although appearing to be one, was constructed in stages over a 21-year period. The library was opened by Andrew Carnegie in 1907, the adjacent Town House offices were opened by King George V in 1914 and finally the Town Hall completed the building in 1928.
 
In 2002, the entire building was closed for a massive refurbishment project, costing £9 million. This was required to bring the internal facilities to current building regulation standards (including modern lifts), whilst also restoring the exterior of this A-listed building. In August 2004, the new integrated Town House complex was revealed to the public, with an official opening by HRH Princess Anne in September. The library won two awards: the “Architect Meets Practicality Award” for libraries of significant architectural interest that are practical and user-friendly and the “Mary Finch Accessibility Award” for the library which most addresses access issues from physical through to cultural barriers.
1841-1901 Censu Collection..JPG
 
For those of you who are not aware of the Reference Library, I would like to share what you can find in there. The resources are incredible, and include the following: Local Authority / Council minutes and reports dating to the 1600s, a section of the Hamilton Estate Papers, a historic collection of over 2000 indexed photographs, a large postcard collection, historic and contemporary electoral registers, Valuation rolls, Hamilton Advertiser and other local newspapers in print bound volume and on micro-film, a collection of fiction and poetry by local authors and about Lanarkshire, a collection of historic and geographical guides relating to Lanarkshire, a large collection of historic and contemporary maps covering Lanarkshire, Census reports on micro-film, free access within the library to the family history website Ancestry.com.
 
There are 15 Internet-linked PCs available in the ActiveIT suite, in addition to free WiFi throughout the building.
 
All published material is searchable on the South Lanarkshire Libraries catalogue online at
 
In addition to the materials held, ‘Scotland’s People’ (https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/gclid=CJKTv5H64tQCFeeV7QodkfcHaA)
 
Vouchers are for sale, there are drop – in sessions for family history advice and guidance, Nostalgia Days at intervals throughout the year, and regular displays relating to the history of Hamilton and Lanarkshire.
Angela Ward..JPG
 
One important thing that I would like to mention is the staff who work at the Reference Library. They are extremely knowledgeable and helpful. One real gem is long-time library assistant Angela Ward whose knowledge of Hamilton is unrivalled. The staff handle family research requests continuously from local and international enquirers.
 
The staff at the Hamilton Reference Library really do try to accommodate everyone, but as you can imagine they are sometimes stretched, so if you are planning to visit the Reference Library for research, then please call in advance to secure a seat and avoid disappointment. The telephone number is 01698 452121.
 
Scott & Angela..JPG
Old Historical Books..JPG
On a more personal note, the Hamilton Advertiser copies that are kept here in storage areas are the last remaining copies ever to be printed of each year and cannot be reproduced in original form. In this digital age, I would like to see the Hamilton Advertiser archived in this way, future proofing the collection for future generations. The collection of Hamilton Advertisers is so large, it would take a lot of time and money for this to happen. These records have preserved the history of Hamilton week by week since 1856. I firmly believe that they should be digitised for future generations to read. Just think that in 100 years from now, someone will be reading what we did today as history! Let’s try put a plan in action and come up with an idea to get funding to have Hamilton’s history stored and made available online.

St. Anne’s School in Hamilton.

St. Anne's1

The Old St. Anne’s school.

Wilma Bolton sent us one of her pictures from her collection which I am sure will stir up a lot of people’s memories. Wilma told us:

“Once the old buildings are demolished they are lost forever. However, I managed to get into Saint Anne’s school before they knocked it down. I took a lot of photographs all of which I gave to Hamilton Reference Library. This means that anyone wishing to see their old school will be able to access them in the Reference Library”

 

Did you attend St. Anne’s? share your memories and tell us your stories from your former school